How do You Deal with a Difficult Boss?

If your boss drives you crazy, read here for tips on what you can do.

Monday, October 16th is Boss’s Day, a holiday set aside for employees to show their thankfulness and appreciation to supervisors. For many, this day is a great opportunity to show managers your gratitude, but not everyone has had a positive experience with their employer. If you don’t have a boss who appreciates you and respects your work, you might not feel like celebrating this holiday. If your boss drives you crazy, read below for some tips on what you can do.

 

Identify the problem.

First, consider what is bothering you. Sometimes it helps to recognize differences in personality or communication. If you’re more laid back and don’t mind doing projects at the last minute as long as they get done, and your boss prefers to complete tasks weeks ahead of time, you’re bound to have some conflict. In fact, you’re probably driving your boss crazy, too. Or, maybe you normally get along with your supervisor, but recently something changed. Figure out what the issue is, and then you will be able to determine what the best solution is.

 

Change your perspective.

Once you’ve pinpointed what is bugging you, try changing the way you see the situation. While it’s easier said than done, it helps to put yourself in the other person’s shoes. Your boss is probably not acting a particular way to try to bother you. If things at work have just recently changed, maybe your supervisor is dealing with other issues you don’t know about. Practice empathizing and just focus on your own tasks. Recognize that situations are always changing, and that things probably won’t be frustrating forever.

 

Adapt your behavior.

Are you continually frustrated with those around you? If you’re annoyed with almost everyone you work with, consider reflecting on the role you play in the situation. Do you need to alter your actions or attitude? Try adjusting your behavior and focus on doing a great job. Make your boss look good by anticipating work needs, adapting to his or her way of doing things, and being accommodating. Likely, this will improve the situation. If you still find yourself unhappy with your supervisor, consider your job and quality of life. If you don’t see a future in your position, think about looking for new employment opportunities.

 

Penmac offers free help finding a job. If you’d like to look for a new position, or try out a new industry, stop by your local Penmac office, and a staffing specialist will be happy to help.

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